Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10216/99738
Author(s): Freitas, P.
Carvalho, D.
Santos, A. C.
Mesquita, J.
Correia, Flora
Xerinda, S.
Marques, R.
Martinez, E.
Sarmento, A.
Medina, J. L.
Title: Assessment of body fat composition disturbances by bioimpedance analysis in HIV-infected adults
Issue Date: 2011
Abstract: HIV-lipodystrophy syndrome is characterized by different patterns of body fat distribution (BFD) which are identified by clinical and body composition (BC) assessment, including bioimpedance analysis (BIA). Our aim was to compare BC in HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) according to 4 distinct phenotypes of BFD (G1-no lipodystrophy, G2-isolated central fat accumulation, G3-lipoatrophy, G4-mixed forms of lipodystrophy) and assessed factors associated with them. Anthropometry and BIA were performed in 344 HIV-1 patients. G2 and G4 phenotype patients had significantly higher fat mass (FM) but no differences were observed in fat-free mass (FFM) and total body water among the 4 phenotypes. Significant negative associations were found between the presence of lipoatrophy and female gender, body mass index (BMI), waist (WC), hip (HC) and thigh circumferences, and total body FM estimated by BIA. After adjustment for gender, CART duration and BMI, G3 had significant lower WC [odds ratio (OR)=0.84; 0.78-0.90] and HC (OR=0.88; 0.81-0.96) mean. Independently of gender, cART duration and BMI, G2 remained significantly associated with higher WC (OR=1.11; 1.05-1.18) and HC (OR=1.15; 1.07-1.23) mean, and with FM estimated by BIA [FM as %, OR=1.17 (1.09-1.26); and FM as kg, OR=1.15 (1.061.25)]. There was a significant positive association between G4 and female gender (OR=1.66; 1.01-2.75), BMI (OR=1.10; 1.04-1.17) and WC (OR=1.15; 1.09-1.21). The similar FFM along the BFD spectrum describes the actual BC of these patients without sarcopenia. In a clinical setting, BIA is an easy and useful tool to evaluate fat mass and FFM and gives us a picture of BC that was not possible with anthropometry. (J. Endocrinol. Invest. 34: e321-e329, 2011) (C)2011, Editrice Kurtis
Description: HIV-lipodystrophy syndrome is characterized by different patterns of body fat distribution (BFD) which are identified by clinical and body composition (BC) assessment, including bioimpedance analysis (BIA). Our aim was to compare BC in HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) according to 4 distinct phenotypes of BFD (G1-no lipodystrophy, G2-isolated central fat accumulation, G3-lipoatrophy, G4-mixed forms of lipodystrophy) and assessed factors associated with them. Anthropometry and BIA were performed in 344 HIV-1 patients. G2 and G4 phenotype patients had significantly higher fat mass (FM) but no differences were observed in fat-free mass (FFM) and total body water among the 4 phenotypes. Significant negative associations were found between the presence of lipoatrophy and female gender, body mass index (BMI), waist (WC), hip (HC) and thigh circumferences, and total body FM estimated by BIA. After adjustment for gender, CART duration and BMI, G3 had significant lower WC [odds ratio (OR)=0.84; 0.78-0.90] and HC (OR=0.88; 0.81-0.96) mean. Independently of gender, cART duration and BMI, G2 remained significantly associated with higher WC (OR=1.11; 1.05-1.18) and HC (OR=1.15; 1.07-1.23) mean, and with FM estimated by BIA [FM as %, OR=1.17 (1.09-1.26); and FM as kg, OR=1.15 (1.061.25)]. There was a significant positive association between G4 and female gender (OR=1.66; 1.01-2.75), BMI (OR=1.10; 1.04-1.17) and WC (OR=1.15; 1.09-1.21). The similar FFM along the BFD spectrum describes the actual BC of these patients without sarcopenia. In a clinical setting, BIA is an easy and useful tool to evaluate fat mass and FFM and gives us a picture of BC that was not possible with anthropometry. (J. Endocrinol. Invest. 34: e321-e329, 2011) (C)2011, Editrice Kurtis
Subject: Ciências da Saúde, Outras ciências médicas
Health sciences, Other medical sciences
Scientific areas: Ciências médicas e da saúde::Outras ciências médicas
Medical and Health sciences::Other medical sciences
URI: https://repositorio-aberto.up.pt/handle/10216/99738
Document Type: Artigo em Revista Científica Internacional
Rights: restrictedAccess
Appears in Collections:FCNAUP - Artigo em Revista Científica Internacional

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