Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10216/94882
Author(s): Charrua, A.
Avelino, A.
Cruz, F.
Title: Modulation of Urinary Bladder Innervation: TRPV1 and Botulinum Toxin A.
Issue Date: 2011
Abstract: The persisting interest around neurotoxins such as vanilloids and botulinum toxin (BoNT) derives from their marked effect on detrusor overactivity refractory to conventional antimuscarinic treatments. In addition, both are administered by intravesical route. This offers three potential advantages. First, intravesical therapy is an easy way to provide high concentrations of pharmacological agents in the bladder tissue without causing unsuitable levels in other organs. Second, drugs effective on the bladder, but inappropriate for systemic administration, can be safely used as it is the case of vanilloids and BoNT. Third, the effects of one single treatment might be extremely longlasting, contributing to render these therapies highly attractive to patients despite the fact that the reasons to the prolonged effect are still incompletely understood. Attractive as it may be, intravesical pharmacological therapy should still be considered as a second-line treatment in patients refractory to conventional oral antimuscarinic therapy or who do not tolerate its systemic side effects. However, the increasing off-label use of these neurotoxins justifies a reappraisal of their pharmacological properties.
Description: The persisting interest around neurotoxins such as vanilloids and botulinum toxin (BoNT) derives from their marked effect on detrusor overactivity refractory to conventional antimuscarinic treatments. In addition, both are administered by intravesical route. This offers three potential advantages. First, intravesical therapy is an easy way to provide high concentrations of pharmacological agents in the bladder tissue without causing unsuitable levels in other organs. Second, drugs effective on the bladder, but inappropriate for systemic administration, can be safely used as it is the case of vanilloids and BoNT. Third, the effects of one single treatment might be extremely longlasting, contributing to render these therapies highly attractive to patients despite the fact that the reasons to the prolonged effect are still incompletely understood. Attractive as it may be, intravesical pharmacological therapy should still be considered as a second-line treatment in patients refractory to conventional oral antimuscarinic therapy or who do not tolerate its systemic side effects. However, the increasing off-label use of these neurotoxins justifies a reappraisal of their pharmacological properties.
Subject: Ciências da Saúde, Outras ciências médicas
Health sciences, Other medical sciences
Scientific areas: Ciências médicas e da saúde::Outras ciências médicas
Medical and Health sciences::Other medical sciences
URI: https://repositorio-aberto.up.pt/handle/10216/94882
Source: Urinary Tract, Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology (202)
Document Type: Capítulo ou Parte de Livro
Rights: restrictedAccess
Appears in Collections:FCNAUP - Capítulo ou Parte de Livro

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