Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10216/99943
Author(s): Silva, RA
Gomes, MS
Appelberg, R
Title: Minor role played by type I tumour necrosis factor receptor in the control of Mycobacterium avium proliferation in infected mice
Issue Date: 2000
Abstract: Control of mycobacterial growth depends on the concerted activity of different cytokines acting in different stages of the development of innate and adaptive immune responses. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) has been shown to play a protective role in Mycobacterium avium infections. Here we assessed the growth of this mycobacterial species in wild-type mice and in mice with a genetically engineered disruption of the type I receptor for TNF-alpha (p55-KO mice). p55-KO mice infected with a low-virulence strain of M. avium exhibited a slightly delayed capacity to eliminate the micro-organisms from the liver as compared with wild-type animals. However, either the growth of this strain in the other organs studied (spleen and lung) or the growth of two other strains of M. avium with intermediate or high virulence, failed to be affected by mutation of the TNF-alpha receptor. p55-KO mice were also as protected by the administration of recombinant interleukin-12 as the heterozygous p55+/- mice. We conclude that signalling through the type I TNF receptor plays a small role in vivo in the induction of mycobacteriostasis during M. avium infection but may improve survival during infection with virulent mycobacteria, independently of the extent of their proliferation.
Subject: Infecções, Medicina básica
Infections, Basic medicine
Scientific areas: Ciências médicas e da saúde::Medicina básica
Medical and Health sciences::Basic medicine
URI: https://repositorio-aberto.up.pt/handle/10216/99943
Document Type: Artigo em Revista Científica Internacional
Rights: restrictedAccess
Appears in Collections:ICBAS - Artigo em Revista Científica Internacional

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