Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10216/93853
Author(s): Viegas, O
Melo, A
Petisca, C
Quelhas, I
Pinho, O
Ferreira, IMPLVO
Title: Modulating effects of red wine and beer on heterocyclic aromatic amines carcinogenesis
Issue Date: 2009
Abstract: It is generally accepted that about one-third of all cancers are related to dietaryfactors. Cooking conditions and dietary culture play a major role in ingestion of foodbornemutagens/carcinogens, such as heterocyclic aromatic amines. These are producedunder normal household cooking conditions from foods rich in protein, such as, meat andfish. Moreover, the effects of these genotoxic compounds on human carcinogenesis willbe influenced by the metabolic activation, detoxification and cellular responses to DNAdamage, involving phase I and II enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 enzymes, NATs,SULTs and UGTs. In humans, these enzymes are inducible and exhibit polymorphicvariation. Thus, differences in biotransformation capacity are a result of both geneticvariation in the expression and the forms of enzymes (polymorphism) as well as dietaryconstituents that modulate the expression and enzyme activity.Several studies support the assumption that a number of red wine and beercomponents can inhibit the activity of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 and suppress heterocyclicaromatic amines genotoxicity. Additionally, the detoxifying activity of GST can beincreased by the intake of red wine and beer. All these aspects indicate that these twobeverages can interfere with enzyme activity involved in the metabolism of heterocyclicaromatic amines and protect against DNA damage and cancer induction by heterocyclicaromatic amines. On the other hand, formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines in cookedmeat, the major source of these compounds in the diet, can be reduced by the use of redwine or beer marinades.This chapter describes the modulating effects of red wine and beer on heterocyclicaromatic amines carcinogenesis, including the influence of some components of thesebeverages on modification of metabolic activation or detoxification activities of HAAsand how to minimize the formation of HAAs during cooking through the use of red wineand beer.
Description: It is generally accepted that about one-third of all cancers are related to dietaryfactors. Cooking conditions and dietary culture play a major role in ingestion of foodbornemutagens/carcinogens, such as heterocyclic aromatic amines. These are producedunder normal household cooking conditions from foods rich in protein, such as, meat andfish. Moreover, the effects of these genotoxic compounds on human carcinogenesis willbe influenced by the metabolic activation, detoxification and cellular responses to DNAdamage, involving phase I and II enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 enzymes, NATs,SULTs and UGTs. In humans, these enzymes are inducible and exhibit polymorphicvariation. Thus, differences in biotransformation capacity are a result of both geneticvariation in the expression and the forms of enzymes (polymorphism) as well as dietaryconstituents that modulate the expression and enzyme activity.Several studies support the assumption that a number of red wine and beercomponents can inhibit the activity of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 and suppress heterocyclicaromatic amines genotoxicity. Additionally, the detoxifying activity of GST can beincreased by the intake of red wine and beer. All these aspects indicate that these twobeverages can interfere with enzyme activity involved in the metabolism of heterocyclicaromatic amines and protect against DNA damage and cancer induction by heterocyclicaromatic amines. On the other hand, formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines in cookedmeat, the major source of these compounds in the diet, can be reduced by the use of redwine or beer marinades.This chapter describes the modulating effects of red wine and beer on heterocyclicaromatic amines carcinogenesis, including the influence of some components of thesebeverages on modification of metabolic activation or detoxification activities of HAAs and how to minimize the formation of HAAs during cooking through the use of red wineand beer.
URI: https://repositorio-aberto.up.pt/handle/10216/93853
Source: Alcoholic beverage consumption and health
Document Type: Capítulo ou Parte de Livro
Rights: restrictedAccess
Appears in Collections:FFUP - Capítulo ou Parte de Livro

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