Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10216/86657
Author(s): Ben Sira, D.
Oliveira, J. M. F.
Title: Hypertension in aging: physical activity as primary prevention
Issue Date: 2007
Abstract: In most physiologic systems, there is considerable evidence that the normal aging processes do not result in significant impairment or dysfunction in the absence of pathology and under resting conditions. However, in response to a stress, the age-related reduction in physiologic reserves causes a loss of regulatory or homeostatic balance. This happens before an individual notices that something is wrong. An additional consequence of age-related changes is an increased perception of effort associated with submaximal work. Thus, a vicious cycle is set up, leading to decreasing exercise capacity, resulting in an elevated perception of effort, subsequently causing avoidance of activity, and finally feeding back to exacerbation of the age-related declines secondary to disuse. Sedentary behavior is an important risk factor for chronic disease morbidity and mortality in aging. However, there is a limited amount of information on the type and amount of activity needed to promote optimal health and function in older people [19]. The purpose of this review is to discuss the important role of exercise training as a primary prevention too] to hypertension. In addition, this review will address the topic of the recommended amount of physical activity required for health promotion along with the current exercise guidelines.
Subject: Medicina clínica
Clinical medicine
Scientific areas: Ciências médicas e da saúde::Medicina clínica
Medical and Health sciences::Clinical medicine
URI: https://repositorio-aberto.up.pt/handle/10216/86657
Document Type: Artigo em Revista Científica Internacional
Rights: restrictedAccess
Appears in Collections:FADEUP - Artigo em Revista Científica Internacional

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