Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10216/120341
Author(s): Conde-Sieira M.
Gesto M.
Batista S.
Linares F.
Villanueva J.L.R.
Míguez J.M.
Soengas J.L.
Valente L.M.P.
Title: Influence of vegetable diets on physiological and immune responses to thermal stress in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis)
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Issue Date: 2018
Abstract: The substitution of fish resources as ingredients for aquafeeds by those based on vegetable sources is needed to ensure aquaculture sustainability in the future. It is known that Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) accepts high dietary content of plant ingredients without altering growth or flesh quality parameters. However, scarce information is available regarding the long-term impact of vegetable diets (combining the inclusion of both vegetable protein and oils) on the stress response and immunity of this fish species. This study aims to evaluate the concomitant effect of the extended use of vegetable protein-based diets with fish oil (FO) replacement (0, 50 or 100%) by vegetable oils (VO), on the response to acute (10 min) or prolonged (4 days) stress, induced by thermal shock. Plasma levels of cortisol, glucose and lactate as well as hepatic levels of glucose, glycogen and lactate were evaluated as primary and secondary responses to stress, 6 and 18 months after feeding the experimental diets (6 and 18 MAF). The brain monoaminergic activity in telencephalon and hypothalamus, and non-specific immune parameters were also evaluated. As expected, thermal shock induced an increase in values of plasma parameters related to stress, which was more evident in acute than in prolonged stress. Stress also affected lactate levels in the liver and the values of the alternative complement pathway-ACH50 in the plasma. Dietary substitution of FO induced an effect per se on some parameters such as decreased hepatic glucose and glycogen levels and peroxidase activity in plasma as well enhanced serotonergic activity in brain of non-stressed fish. The results obtained in some parameters indicate that there is an interaction between the use of vegetable diets with the physiological response to thermal stress, as is the case of the hepatic lactate, serotonergic neurotransmission in brain, and the activity of ACH50 in plasma. These results suggest that the inclusion of VO in plant protein based diets point to a slightly inhibited stress response, more evident for an acute than a prolonged stress. © 2018 Conde-Sieira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Subject: 5 hydroxyindoleacetic acid
fish oil
glucose
glycogen
hydrocortisone
lactic acid
lysozyme
peroxidase
serotonin
vegetable oil
hydrocortisone
lactic acid
plant protein
vegetable oil
animal experiment
animal tissue
Article
complement alternative pathway
controlled study
glucose blood level
glycogen liver level
heat shock
hydrocortisone blood level
hypothalamus
immune response
lactate blood level
nonhuman
serotoninergic transmission
Solea senegalensis
telencephalon
temperature stress
vegetable
analysis
animal
animal food
aquaculture
blood
chemistry
flatfish
immunology
liver
metabolism
physiological stress
physiology
temperature
vegetable
Animal Feed
Animals
Aquaculture
Blood Glucose
Flatfishes
Hydrocortisone
Lactic Acid
Liver
Plant Oils
Stress, Physiological
Temperature
Vegetable Proteins
Vegetables
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10216/120341
Source: PLoS ONE, vol. 13(3): e0194353
Related Information: info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/FCT/5876/147268/PT
Document Type: Artigo em Revista Científica Internacional
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:CIIMAR - Artigo em Revista Científica Internacional

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